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Unleashing the Power of GPT4: Microsoft's Security Copilot is the Ultimate Cybersecurity Gamechanger



I found myself in a conversation with one of the most knowledgeable researchers in the industry, discussing the integration of AI into cybersecurity platforms and what it could potentially mean for the future of the industry. The insights and revelations that came out of that discussion were truly eye-opening and left me eager to learn more about this exciting topic.


High Level Executive Summary:

Microsoft has announced the addition of Security Copilot, a natural language chatbot that can write and analyze code, to its suite of products enabled by OpenAI's GPT-4 generative AI model. Security Copilot can handle security-related tasks, allowing IT personnel to type in prompts like "look for presence of compromise" to make threat hunting easier, summarize an event or incident, create a shareable report, and reverse-engineer a malicious script, among other things. The tool integrates with several existing Microsoft security offerings and offers transparent audit trails. However, managers and department heads should have a framework in place to keep human eyes on the work before the code goes live, as AI can still return false or misleading results. Microsoft's main rival in the field, Google, has not yet announced a dedicated AI product for enterprise security.


Christian: Hey, have you heard about Microsoft Security Copilot?


Anonymous Researcher: Yes, I have. It's a natural language chatbot that can write and analyze code to detect, analyze, and mitigate cybersecurity threats.


Christian: That's right. The tool can answer questions about vulnerabilities and reverse-engineer problems using the OpenAI large language model and a security-specific model from Microsoft. Enterprises familiar with the Azure Hyperscale infrastructure line will find the same security and privacy features attached to Security Copilot.


Anonymous Researcher: Security Copilot can automate some of the tasks to make threat hunting easier. Users can save prompts and share prompt books with other members of their team. The data and prompts are secure within each organization, and the AI creates transparent audit trails so developers can see what questions were asked and how Copilot answered them.


Christian: Wow, that's impressive. But is AI safe for cybersecurity?


Anonymous Researcher: While AI can fill in gaps for overworked or undertrained personnel, managers and department heads should have a framework in place to keep human eyes on the work before code goes live. AI can still return false or misleading results. Security teams should approach AI tools with the same rigor as they would when evaluating any new product.


Christian: That's a valid point. I remember OpenAI faced a data breach a few days ago. What happened to that?


Anonymous Researcher: Yes, OpenAI faced a data breach on March 20, 2023. They took ChatGPT offline earlier this week due to a bug in an open-source library that allowed some users to see titles from another active user's chat history. Redis client open-source library, redis-py, has been patched now.


Christian: Oh, that's concerning. And what about Google? Have they announced any dedicated AI product for enterprise security?


Anonymous Researcher: No, Google hasn't yet announced a dedicated AI product for enterprise security. Microsoft's cybersecurity arm is now a $20 billion business, and a few other companies that focus on security have tried adding OpenAI's talkative product to their platforms, like Orca Security, Skyhawk Security, and ARMO.

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